McConnell finally blames Trump for insurrection, but that’s not enough. The Senate must convict

The second impeachment trial of Donald Trump in the U.S. Senate is likely to be a real trial, unlike the first time around when Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and his fellow Republicans conducted a sham process, refusing to hear witnesses and refusing to consider the gravity of Trump's crimes. That's changed, now that their place of work—their essential home—has been defiled by an insurrectionist mob incited by Trump. That the impeachment hearings will go forward this time was made clear Tuesday by none other than McConnell, when he stated on the floor "The mob was fed lies. They were provoked by the president and other powerful people."

Despite McConnell's essential granting of the validity of the charges against Trump and recognition that the process will proceed, there will still be Republicans and Trump apologists who will argue that the Senate shouldn't continue because Trump is already gone—variations on the supposed "unity" theme we have been hearing since January 6 and the violent, armed, deadly insurrection Trump instigated. Some will argue that the Senate cannot try a former president for acts during his or her presidency. Most nonpartisan experts have called that idea bunk, but now we have the pretty darned definitive conclusion of the Congressional Research Service, which looks at all the scholarship and all the precedent, and concludes that it is well within the power of Congress to convict a departed official and that "even if an official is no longer in office, an impeachment conviction may still be viewed as necessary by Congress to clearly delineate the outer bounds of acceptable conduct in office for the future."

The attorneys writing at Congressional Research Service start at the beginning. "As an initial matter, a number of scholars have argued that the delegates at the Constitutional Convention appeared to accept that former officials may be impeached for conduct that occurred while in office," they write. "This understanding also tracks with certain state constitutions predating the Constitution, which allowed for impeachments of officials after they left office." That's following the precedent of British law and practice, which included the impeachment of the former governor-general of Bengal Warren Hastings, impeached two years after his resignation and while the Constitutional Convention was actually happening. The Framers were aware of this while it was happening, and in crafting the impeachment articles did depart from some British precedent—for example requiring a two-thirds rather than simple majority vote for conviction—but they didn't explicitly restrict Congress's power to convict a departed official.

There's the plain text of the Constitution, however, which doesn't really definitively say one way or the other. "The President, Vice President and all Civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office on Impeachment … and Conviction." Then there's the other part: "judgment in cases of impeachment shall not extend further than to removal from office, and disqualification to hold and enjoy any office of honor, trust or profit under the United States [emphasis added]," which follows from removal from office. How could you disqualify an already-departed and deserving official from holding future office if you couldn't impeach them first? As one scholar argued all the way back in the 1920s, "an official's resignation following an initial impeachment by the House but before conviction in the Senate may not 'deprive the people of the full measure of the protection afforded them' through the additional remedy of disqualification."

What was in the Framer's heads isn't too hard to divine, either. They told us. CRS relates this: "President John Quincy Adams, who, during debate on the House's authority to impeach Daniel Webster for conduct that occurred while he had been Secretary of State, said in relation to his own acts as President: 'I hold myself, so long as I have the breath of life in my body, amenable to impeachment by this House for everything I did during the time I held any public office.'" There's also the precedence of the 1876 impeachment of Secretary of War William Belknap for, essentially, bribery—accepting payments in return for making an appointment. Belknap resigned hours before a House committee determined there was "unquestioned evidence of malfeasance," but the committee recommended impeachment anyway, despite his resignation. The House debated moving forward, and ultimately approved the resolution, without objection. The Senate debated and deliberated on the issue of whether he could be tried in the Senate as a former official for more than two weeks, and ultimately "determined by a vote of 37 to 29 that Secretary Belknap was 'amenable to trial by impeachment for acts done as Secretary of War, notwithstanding his resignation of said office before he was impeached.'" That vote established the representation of an impeached former official being subject to a Senate trial. A majority voted to convict, but not a two-thirds majority.

What the CRS report does not go into deeply, and what would be the larger point of a Trump conviction, is the disqualification part. That would come in a simple majority vote following a successful conviction, and would prevent Trump from ever holding "any office of honor, trust or profit under the United States." They can't get to that part—the part that matters to McConnell and plenty of other Republicans—if they don't do the first part, convict.

McConnell's condemnation of Trump on Tuesday means little more than McConnell trying to create distance between himself and the man he—almost single-handedly—allowed to remain in a position in which he could raise an insurrection against McConnell's own branch. This could have been prevented if, one year ago, McConnell and Senate Republicans had offered even one word of rebuke to contain Trump. If at any point in the last four years McConnell had done anything to curtail Trump's worst instincts. Hell, if we wound the clock back to late summer 2016 when the entire intelligence community was warning congressional leadership that Russia was intervening in the election on Trump's behalf, when McConnell refused to let that information be made public. But I digress.

Yes, Trump can still be impeached, convicted, and barred from ever holding office again. That's if Senate Republicans care more about the country, about their own institution, about the future of their own party than about their next election and whether the MAGA crowd will primary them.

House Republicans Call For Cheney’s Removal From GOP Conference Chair After Impeachment Vote

Over half of House Republicans have called for the removal of Liz Cheney (R-WY) from the Chair of the House GOP Conference.

According to The Hill’s Juliegrace Brufke, Republican aides say that over 115 GOP members are supporting a move to express a vote of “no confidence” in Cheney’s leadership after her recent vote to impeach President Trump.

The vote would be done by secret ballot.

As GOP Conference Chair, Cheney is the third highest ranking Republican in the House of Representatives.

RELATED: If Republicans Put America First, They’ll Remove Liz Cheney, Not Donald Trump

Move To Censure

Currently, more than half of House Republicans are on board with the censure of Cheney. Veteran and newly elected Representatives alike have called for Cheney to step down.

Matt Rosendale (R-MT) said, “Rep. Cheney did not consult with the rest of our conference before supporting impeachment.”

He went on to say that, “She failed to abide by the spirit of the Conference rulesand is ignoring the preferences of Republican voters. I’m calling on her to step down as Conference Chair.”

Freedom Caucus Chairman Andy Biggs (R-AZ) said, “The reality is, she’s not representing the Conference. She’s not representing the Republican ideals. And I think that’s a problem…I’m not alone in that sentiment.” 

Rep. Matt Gaetz said that, “Cheney has left the America First movement.”

RELATED: Poll: Republican Voters Are Siding With Trump Over Mitch McConnell

Cheney In Trouble At Home

While a formal censure in the House has not yet happened, Cheney’s Wyoming constituents are not happy with her choice to vote for impeachment.

On Tuesday, Carbon County Wyoming Republican Central Committee unanimously passed a resolution to officially censure Cheney.

“Representative Cheney ignored and violated caucus rules by disclosing her intent to join the Democrat Party’s proposed move to vote for impeachment to the media prior to having any evidence presented to the body. 

“Representative Cheney did vote in favor of the impeachment of President Donald J. Trump despite the lack of any formal hearing being held, evidence being presented, witnesses being sworn to testify, or accusers being questioned.”  

The resolution went on to say that Wyoming voters went to the polls in November to, “express their will, their values, and their stated preference in re-electing President Donald J. Trump by a larger margin, and in greater numbers, than those who re-elected Representative Cheney.”

Carbon County GOP Chairman Joey Correnti came down hard on Cheney, saying she has refused to answer angry constituents regarding her vote.

Correnti said, “People in the county party have attempted to get ahold of Rep. Cheney through email, phone calls-and I think only one person got a response from a staffer and it was pretty short.”

RELATED: Liz Cheney Voting To Impeach Trump Backfires On Her As She’s Censured By Wyoming Republicans

Possible Challengers For GOP House Chair And 2022 Implications

There are several Republicans who have been mentioned, or are actively considering challenging Cheney for her Chairmanship. Among the names mentioned are, Rep. Lee Zeldin (R-NY), and Elise Stephanik (R-NY).   

Back home in Wyoming, a possible 2022 primary challenger has already emerged in State Senator Anthony Bouchard (R).

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Report: Trump Wants To Create New ‘Patriot Party’

The Wall Street Journal reported on Tuesday evening that President Trump is interested in creating a new third party once he leaves office.

The reported name? The ‘Patriot Party.’

RELATED: Hillary Clinton, Pelosi Push Conspiracy Theory Suggesting Trump Updated Putin About The Capitol Riots, Demand 9/11-Style Investigation

Aides Claim Trump Has Mentioned Creating New Party

The Journal cited “people familiar with the matter” who say Trump has discussed creating a “Patriot Party” and that “several aides and other people close to him” have said the same. 

Trump has a widespread appeal with both independent voters and those who have been politically apathetic, meaning their loyalty to the Republican Party is primarily situational.

Give them Republicans they like – Donald Trump – and they might vote Republican.

Give them Republicans they don’t like – Mitch McConnell, Mitt Romney, and the entire GOP establishment – and there is a good chance they won’t vote for the Republican candidate.

Mitch McConnell’s Actions Could Be Deciding Factor

Mitch McConnell should think long and hard about whether he wants to push impeachment.

Trump has feuded with Republican lawmakers in Washington in recent months, with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell at the top of that list.

On Tuesday, McConnell accused Trump of supposedly inciting the January 6 Capitol Hill attack and said moving on with impeachment in the Senate was a matter of conscience.

The Wall Street Journal notes that it isn’t entirely clear if Trump was merely talking out loud about creating a new third party or actually serious about putting in the work that such an effort would take. 

Could Trump Make A Third Party Viable?

Third parties in the United States have struggled historically, with Ross Perot’s Reform Party making the strongest showing in modern presidential politics, in 1992.

POLL: Would You Join Trump's Patriot Party?

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That third party effort did well in part because it had a strong personality leading it in Mr. Perot.

RELATED: Report: 12 National Guardsmen Removed From Biden Inauguration For Alleged Ties To Right-Wing Groups

One can say many things about Donald Trump, but most would agree – friend or foe – that he is a strong personality.

A new party led by Donald Trump could cripple the Republican Party because he might be able to attract countless Americans who would have otherwise voted Republican.

In pushing for impeachment, Mitch McConnell and GOP leadership should be careful what they wish for.

The post Report: Trump Wants To Create New ‘Patriot Party’ appeared first on The Political Insider.

McConnell Turns On Trump Again: Says Trump Responsible For Capitol Violence

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Tuesday accused President Donald Trump and his supporters of spreading inaccuracies and lies about the election that led to the January 6 riots in Washington D.C.

McConnell went on to accuse Trump and his supporters of provoking the violence and acts of vandalism. Five people died during the chaos that broke out during the certification of the electoral votes. 

“The mob was fed lies. They were provoked by the President and other powerful people. And they tried to use fear and violence to stop a specific proceeding of the first branch of the Federal Government which they did not like. But we pressed on,” McConnell said.  

To Impeach Or Not To Impeach 

Trump was impeached for a second time on January 13 as the House of Representatives charged him with “incitement to insurrection.”

RELATED: Liz Cheney Voting To Impeach Trump Backfires On Her As She’s Censured By Wyoming Republicans

The Impeachment process now moves to the Senate.

Questions have surrounded any future trial, including if a former president could be impeached.

One of the biggest questions has been whether or not McConnell would vote to impeach.

McConnell has not ruled out a vote to impeach. Mike Allen, founder of Axios, and former Politico Playbook Editor, says there is a “50-50 chance” McConnell will vote “yes” in order to “consider his own legacy and defend the Senate and the institution.” 

McConnell Not A Dependable Ally

Should Mitch McConnell go ahead with an impeachment trial, it would not be the first time that he has gone against Trump.

In the days following the protests and violence at the nation’s Capitol, when members of Congress clamored for removing the president by way of the 25th Amendment, a report from Fox News claimed that McConnell was “done” and “furious” with the president. 

The Fox News article also claimed that McConnell was “pleased” that Democrats in the House had introduced the articles of impeachment.

In another article, The Daily Mail had cited sources who said McConnell could consider a “yes” vote on impeachment, citing his desire to “purge him from the GOP.”  

McConnell Rebukes Republicans For Defending Trump

As the Senate began to take up certification of electoral college votes, McConnell warned those in his own party not to engage in objections to the electoral college.

Sen. Josh Hawley (R-MO) and Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) were vocal opponents of electoral college certification.

At the time, McConnell argued that a vote count challenge would be “terrible” for Republicans because they would “have to vote it down,” thus making them appear to be against the president. 

RELATED: Mitch McConnell Blasts Republican Senators Who Challenge Electoral College Results

At the beginning of January, the Senate also voted to override Trump’s veto on the defense bill, known as The National Defense Authorization Act.

The bill would have included pay raises for American soldiers and equipment upgrades, but did not include a repeal of section 230, a law that protects internet companies for bring liable for what is posted by them or third parties.

Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT) said that he would delay a quick vote for the final override unless McConnell brought a vote for $2000 stimulus checks to the floor, the vote was never brought, and the Senate voted to end debate on the veto override that afternoon.

A source close to McConnell reportedly said that, “The Senate institutional loyalists are fomenting a counterrevolution” to Trump.

McConnell seems to be prepared to do what he indicated, and that is to “move forward.”

The post McConnell Turns On Trump Again: Says Trump Responsible For Capitol Violence appeared first on The Political Insider.

News Wrap: U.S. surpasses 400,000 deaths from COVID-19

In our news wrap Tuesday, the U.S. reached 400,000 deaths from COVID nearly equaling the number of Americans killed in World War II, President-elect Biden had an emotional departure from his home state of Delaware on the eve of inauguration, Biden will offer a sweeping immigration bill once in office, and the incoming Senate majority leader says President Trump's impeachment trial is a priority.

Liz Cheney Voting To Impeach Trump Backfires On Her As She’s Censured By Wyoming Republicans

Last week, Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY), who is the third-highest ranking House Republican, broke with her party last week when she was one of ten Republicans to vote with Democrats in impeaching President Donald Trump.

This has already come back to bite her, however, as she has just been censured by Wyoming Republicans for making this vote.

Liz Cheney’s Impeachment Vote Backfires

The House voted to impeach Trump for a second time by a vote of 232-197. Prior to the vote, Cheney released a scathing statement blaming Trump for the Capitol riots. She claimed that Trump “summoned” the rioters and then “lit the flame of this attack.”

“Everything that followed was his doing,” she added. “None of this would have happened without the president. The president could have immediately and forcefully intervened to stop the violence. He did not.”

This backfired on Cheney on Monday, when the Republican Party Central Committee in Carbon County, Wyoming voted unanimously to censure her for supporting impeachment.

“Representative Cheney has violated the trust of her voters, failed to faithfully represent a very large majority of motivated Wyoming voters, and neglected her duty to represent the party and the will of the people who elected her to represent them,” the censure resolution declared.

Related: If Republicans Put America First, They’ll Remove Liz Cheney, Not Donald Trump

“The Carbon County Republican Party does hereby censure U.S. Representative Liz Cheney of Wyoming for her actions on Wednesday, January 13th 2020, as those actions stand in contradiction to the quantifiable will of the majority of the electorate of Wyoming, and for devaluing the political influence of the State of Wyoming by voting in favor of a process that followed no known hearing process, provided no evidence to consider, called no witnesses to be sworn, and allowed none of the accusers to be questioned by the accused,” the resolution added.

Things Get Worse For Cheney

Carbon County GOP Chairman Joey Correnti blasted Cheney to the Washington Times, saying that she has thus far refused to answer constituents angry over her vote.

“People in the county party have attempted to get a hold of Rep. Cheney through email, phone calls — and I think only one person got a response from a staffer and it was pretty short,” Correnti said. “We haven’t heard anything.”

The Wyoming Republican Party had already released a statement that slammed Cheney for voting in favor of impeachment.

“The wind in Wyoming has been horrendous today — with gusts up to 65 miles per hour,” the party said. “That is nothing compared to the whirlwind created by Representative Cheney’s announcement that she would be voting to impeach President Trump, and her subsequent follow-through of doing just that.”

“There has not been a time during our tenure when we have seen this type of an outcry from our fellow Republicans, with the anger and frustration being palpable in the comments we have received,” the statement added. “The consensus is clear that those who are reaching out to the Party vehemently disagree with Representative Cheney’s decision and actions.”

Pressure has been mounting for Cheney to resign, with House Freedom Caucus Chairman Andy Biggs (R-AZ) saying that she does not represent Republican ideals.

“The reality is, she’s not representing the conference, she’s not representing the Republican ideals,” Biggs told Fox News. “And I think that that’s a problem…I’m not alone in that sentiment.”

Read Next: Republicans Call For Liz Cheney To Resign Leadership Post After Calling For Trump’s Impeachment

This piece was written by James Samson on January 19, 2021. It originally appeared in LifeZette and is used by permission.

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Freshman GOP Rep Admits Voting To Impeach Trump May Have Destroyed His Career
Katie Couric Asks How We’ll ‘Deprogram People Who Signed Up For The Cult Of Trump?’
Rival Senate Trial Concepts Roil DC

The post Liz Cheney Voting To Impeach Trump Backfires On Her As She’s Censured By Wyoming Republicans appeared first on The Political Insider.

Support for convicting Trump grows among Republicans

Support for a Senate conviction of Donald Trump among Republican voters has grown since last week, though it's still not particularly high. But as more information emerges about the Trump-inspired violent insurrection at the U.S. Capitol, GOP support for convicting Trump has ticked up a half dozen points from 14% on Jan. 8-11 to 20% on Jan. 15-17, according to new Politico/Morning Consult polling released Tuesday.

It's still wildly low by any reasonable measure, but given that Trump commanded roughly 90% support among the GOP base throughout his term, it's a notable break from someone who conservative voters never held to account for anything he did. About 86% of Democrats also "strongly" or "somewhat" support Senate conviction, as do some 50% of independents.

Last week, FiveThirtyEight.com also found that overall support for Trump's impeachment in an average of polls was up a handful of points from where it stood during the Ukraine scandal, 52% now versus about 47%-48% then.

No matter what, Trump is leaving office with a wildly diminished profile because, well, he sucks and he actually launched a deadly attack on U.S. soil, the nation's duly elected Congress, and the government he was supposedly charged with leading. In the latest NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll, 60% of respondents said he would be remembered as a below-average president, with 47% saying he qualified as one of the worst presidents in U.S. history.

In Gallup’s final polling, Trump's job approval stood at 34%—his lowest to date in the poll. He averaged 41% approval throughout his tenure, hitting an all-time high of 49% early last year around the time of his Senate acquittal and the early days of the pandemic. "Trump is the only president not to register a 50% job approval rating at any point in his presidency since Gallup began measuring presidential job approval in 1938," writes the outlet. 

So much winning. 

Freshman GOP Rep Admits Voting To Impeach Trump May Have Destroyed His Career

Freshman Rep. Peter Meijer (R-MI) spoke out on Sunday to admit that voting in favor of impeaching President Donald Trump last week may have destroyed his political career.

Meijer Votes To Impeach Trump

The House voted to impeach Trump for a second time last week over the Capitol riots earlier this month, with the article of impeachment charging Trump with “incitement of insurrection.” The impeachment was approved by a vote of 232-197, with every Democrat and ten Republicans in the House voting in favor of it.

Meijer was one of the ten Republicans to vote in favor of impeaching Trump in a move that he himself admitted one day later that “may have been an act of political suicide.”

While appearing on ABC’s “This Week” on Sunday, Meijer was asked by host George Stephanopolous, “Are you concerned you ended your career with that vote?”

“Oh, I may very well have,” Meijer responded. “But I think it’s also important that we have elected leaders who are not thinking solely about what’s in their individual self-interest, not what is going to be politically expedient, but what we actually need for country.”

Related: If Republicans Put America First, They’ll Remove Liz Cheney, Not Donald Trump

Meijer Explains His Reason For Voting To Impeach Trump

Earlier in the interview, the freshman Republican congressman explained his reasoning behind voting to impeach Trump.

“Impeaching a president, especially a president of my own party, was nothing that we ever hoped to do. Many of us deliberated deeply,” Meijer said.

“This was not as easy as just saying what is in our best political interest, but, frankly, looking at the evidence, looking at the facts of the case, reading the article and asking, ‘Is this true by our own experience, by our lived experience?’ And it was,” he continued. 

“You know, I think this is a time for reflection, but it’s also a time for accountability. And that’s something that I am deeply committed to,” he added.

Related: Ben Sasse And The GOP Aim To Purge Trumpism, Return To Bush-Era

“You know, I’m calling on my party to restore trust, to restore the trust of the voting public and to ensure that we never allow the actions that led up to Jan. 6 and what happened on Jan. 6, we never allow that outburst of political violence to occur in our name again,” Meijer said. 

A Senate impeachment trial against Trump is expected to take place after Joe Biden is inaugurated later this week.

This piece was written by James Samson on January 18, 2021. It originally appeared in LifeZette and is used by permission.

Read more at LifeZette:
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Masters of Projection and Deception. Democrats Don’t Want to Govern Us; They Want to Crush Us and Then Rule Us.

The post Freshman GOP Rep Admits Voting To Impeach Trump May Have Destroyed His Career appeared first on The Political Insider.

Katie Couric Asks How We’ll ‘Deprogram People Who Signed Up For The Cult Of Trump?’

While appearing on “Real Time with Bill Maher” this week, television personality Katie Couric wasted no time in shaming President Donald Trump and his millions of supporters in the worst ways possible.

Couric Attacks Trump And His Supporters

At one point in the interview, Couric went so far as to pose the question, “How are we going to really almost deprogram these people who have signed up for the cult of Trump?” She then attacked Republican lawmakers who have remained friendly towards Trump in the wake of the Capitol riots earlier this month.

“It is so shocking. … Not only are they not conceding, Bill, but their thoughts – that there might have been some collusion among members of Congress, some are refusing to go through magnetometers … to check for weapons, they’re not wearing masks during this siege,” Couric said.

“I mean, it’s really bizarre, isn’t it, when you think about how AWOL so many of these members of Congress have gotten,” she added.

“But I also think some of them are believing the garbage that they are being fed 24/7 on the internet, by their constituents, and they bought into this big lie,” Couric continued. “And the question is how are we going to really almost deprogram these people who have signed up for the cult of Trump.”

Related: WaPo Reporter Says Trump Voters ‘Need To Be Deprogrammed’

Couric Doubles Down

Not stopping there, Couric also called for Trump’s impeachment.

“But Bill, if you commit a crime and then you move, does that means we’re not going to charge you with a crime because you’re moving out of the neighborhood? I mean, it’s ludicrous,” Couric said. “I think there have to be guardrails on presidential power. He incited violence. … He was really, really inciting violence.”

She then fantasized about a “Hollywood ending” to Trump’s presidency in which Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) “comes out as the hero” to convict the president. Unsurprisingly, she celebrated the fact that Trump had been banned from social media platforms like Twitter and Facebook.

“You’re not allowed to yell fire at a crowded theater, so if you’re inciting violence and you’re spreading lies that are getting people fired up, encouraging violence, I think there should be some standard,” Couric said.

Related: Nancy Pelosi Accuses Capitol Rioters Of Choosing ‘Their Whiteness’ Over Democracy

Couric Celebrates Biden Inauguration

She then celebrated Joe Biden’s upcoming inauguration, calling it an “important symbol of closing the chapter on Donald Trump.” Maher somewhat disagreed, warning that Biden should hold a small, indoor inauguration ceremony to protect against a potential coronavirus risk.

“Joe Biden – he’s a friggin’ tragedy magnet,” Maher said. “He broke his foot playing with his dog. I mean, his eye exploded from blinking. We have got to treat this guy like the baby in ‘Children of Men.'”

Couric, however, was quick to downplay any potential Biden health concerns.

“I think he’s pretty vibrant and in good shape,” Couric said of Biden. “You saw him run across the stage when he made that speech. … I mean, compare his physical fitness to Donald Trump, hello!”

Couric is set to be the guest host on “Jeopardy!” this week, the second guest host behind Ken Jennings after the death of Alex Trebek.

This piece was written by James Samson on January 18, 2021. It originally appeared in LifeZette and is used by permission.

Read more at LifeZette:
Tucker Carlson Tells Hard Truths About The Assault On The Capitol
Cawthorn Targeted For No Reason
Masters of Projection and Deception. Democrats Don’t Want to Govern Us; They Want to Crush Us and Then Rule Us.

The post Katie Couric Asks How We’ll ‘Deprogram People Who Signed Up For The Cult Of Trump?’ appeared first on The Political Insider.

Karl Rove Warns Trump Will Be Convicted In The Senate If He Continues To Claim Election Fraud

Republican strategist Karl Rove spoke out over the weekend to warn that Donald Trump will be convicted in the Senate by a bipartisan vote if he continues to claim that election fraud took place.

Chris Wallace Questions Karl Rove

“Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell says that he is keeping an open mind about the second impeachment trial of Donald Trump, a big difference, sharp difference, from his clear opposition from the very start of the first impeachment trial just a year ago,” said Fox News host Chris Wallace.

“What do you think, Karl, are the chances that 17 Senate Republicans, and that’s what it would take if all of the Democrats vote for conviction, 17 Senate Republicans would vote to convict Donald Trump and to keep them from running again?” he added.

Rove Issues Warning 

“Normally we say not much chance, but I think Leader McConnell’s statement is a sign that every Republican Senator needs to take this seriously,” Rove replied. “I think it’s all going to boil down what’s the president’s defense.”

“Rudy Giuliani charted a very bad course for the president in the morning papers when he suggested that the argument was going to be in there couldn’t have been incitement because all the charges of widespread voter fraud are true,” he added. 

“Well, those charges and the so-called experts that the campaign has mustered to advocate them have been rejected by over 50 courts with judges appointed by President Trump, President Obama, Present Bush, President Clinton, and I think even one Reagan justice,” Rove continued.

Related: Karl Rove Warns Trump ‘America Likes Comebacks But They Don’t Like Sore Losers’

Rove Doubles Down

“So if it’s the Rudy Giuliani defense, there is a strong likelihood that more than 17 Republicans will because essentially that argument is this was justified, the attack on the Capital and the attempt to end the congressional hearing on certifying the election was justified because all these charges are true and frankly they aren’t.”

“They have been given every opportunity to prove them in a court of law and have failed to do so,” Rove concluded. “I think it really boils down to what’s the defense that the president is going to make, and if it is Rudy Giuliani’s defense, I think it raises the likelihood of more than 17 Republicans voting for conviction.”

Trump was impeached for a second time last week by the House, and a Senate impeachment trial is expected to take place after the inauguration of Joe Biden later this week.

Read Next: Karl Rove Says Trump’s War On The Media ‘Does Not Help Him’

This piece was written by James Samson on January 18, 2021. It originally appeared in LifeZette and is used by permission.

Read more at LifeZette:
Tucker Carlson Tells Hard Truths About The Assault On The Capitol
Cawthorn Targeted For No Reason
Masters of Projection and Deception. Democrats Don’t Want to Govern Us; They Want to Crush Us and Then Rule Us.

The post Karl Rove Warns Trump Will Be Convicted In The Senate If He Continues To Claim Election Fraud appeared first on The Political Insider.