A year after Breonna Taylor’s death at the hands of Louisville police, the world still says her name

Breonna Taylor most likely never dreamt that she’d become a household name, but here we are.  In the darkness of March 13, 2020, three plainclothes Louisville Metro Police officers forced their way into the home of Taylor, an emergency room technician and former EMT. They were there on a “no-knock” warrant, searching for a man who was already in custody. Taylor’s boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, let off a warning shot from his own legally-possessed firearm. The plainclothes police fired off 32 shots in response, and six hit Taylor. The 26-year-old died in her apartment; not one of the police officers attempted to provide medical assistance. Taylor was Black; predictably, the Louisville officers were white.

The horror story is still not resolved, though Louisville did settle with Taylor’s family in September, and Walker finally got all charges permanently dropped less than a week before this heartbreaking anniversary. No police officers—including Myles Cosgrove, who fired the fatal shot—faced any charges for her death. Grand jurors blame Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron, who served as special prosecutor, for “terribly misus(ing)” them as he sought that outcome, and (unsuccessfully) attempted to  impeach and remove him from office.

A year after Breonna Taylor’s death, there remain more questions than answers as the world comes together to say her name.

Say her name. Remember her face. 

One year ago, on this date: Breonna Taylor was shot and killed by Louisville police officers in her apartment. pic.twitter.com/1BzDzxU4XG

— philip lewis (@Phil_Lewis_) March 13, 2021

Remember: It’s not just what “was” that was taken away. Taylor never got to find out “what could be.”

On this night last year, Breonna still had a world of dreams ahead of her.

— Charles Booker (@Booker4KY) March 13, 2021

That her killers walk free while Taylor died for committing no crime is no accident. It’s just the system working.

Today, Breonna Taylor should be enjoying her Saturday with family and friends. Instead, it’s the anniversary of her murder and her killers - Brett Hankison, Myles Cosgrove and Jonathan Mattingly - walk free. The system was built to allow this. Don’t ignore that. Get involved. pic.twitter.com/2XBqlQ0FhF

— Ava DuVernay (@ava) March 13, 2021

Louisville Police may have turned Taylor into a statistic, but she was a person.

Breonna Taylor: who she was, how she died, and why justice is long overdue. pic.twitter.com/wp4IMybN8W

— The Daily Show (@TheDailyShow) March 13, 2021

Women of color—particularly Black women—rarely attract much attention when they’re victims of police brutality. Taylor’s mom, Tamika Palmer, is thankful she, with the help of attorney Ben Crump, was able to garner wide concern for Taylor’s killing even as she continues to seek justice and police accountability. “I couldn’t imagine something like this happening to her and that nobody was paying attention,” Palmer told The 19th.

The #SayHerName movement didn’t start with Taylor, and it does not end with her.

It’s been one year since we lost Breonna Taylor.    We cannot forget her—or the countless other Black lives that have been so needlessly taken from us. We must continue to #SayHerName, demand accountability & take action against these tragic injustices. #BlackLivesMatter

— Senator Reverend Raphael Warnock (@SenatorWarnock) March 13, 2021

No justice. No peace. 

Today marks 365 days of injustice. Breonna Taylor’s murder was an injustice. The ensuing cover-up was an injustice. Daniel Cameron’s mockery of a grand jury hearing was an injustice.

— Cori Bush (@CoriBush) March 13, 2021

This powerful video from LeBron James’ More than a Vote shows how Breonna Taylor’s death changed us.

Breonna Taylor was killed one year ago today. We #SayHerName because her life mattered. We #SayHerName because she deserves justice. We #SayHerName because our work must continue until Black lives are treated with equal value. pic.twitter.com/EyxAtMPzjw

— More Than A Vote (@morethanavote) March 13, 2021

Say. Her. Name.

One year. We will never forget you, Breonna Taylor. We will never stop saying your name. pic.twitter.com/HOEU6e4fok

— Meena Harris (@meenaharris) March 13, 2021

Again: The battle for police reform is far from over. 

It’s been one year, 365 days, since Breonna Taylor has not gotten justice...and we can’t rest until she gets it. #SayHerName #JusticeForBreonnaTaylor pic.twitter.com/Srinuw8umm

— Wanda Sykes (@iamwandasykes) March 13, 2021

Missouri Rep. Cori Bush says it better than I could.

Tomorrow marks the one-year anniversary of Breonna Taylor’s murder. To Breonna’s mother, Tamika Palmer: We won’t stop making them say her name. pic.twitter.com/C8xL9VQFXh

— Cori Bush (@CoriBush) March 13, 2021

Please feel free to share tributes to Breonna yourself, both on social media and in the comments.

Jurors want Attorney General Daniel Cameron impeached for shameless lies in Breonna Taylor case

Three grand jurors in the Breonna Taylor case have had enough of Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron’s lies and manipulation, and on Friday they decided to do something about it. They filed a petition with the Kentucky House of Representatives calling for Cameron's impeachment after he failed to even mention a homicide charge in his presentation to the jury last September, according to the Louisville Courier-Journal

Taylor, a 26-year-old emergency medical technician, died on March 13 after officers smashed through her door while she was sleeping and fired 32 times into her apartment, hitting her six times. But Cameron only presented to the jury three wanton endangerment charges, regarding shots fired into a neighboring apartment. Kevin Glogower, the lawyer representing the three grand jurors, said in the petition: “The Grand Jurors did not choose this battle. This battle chose them."

Glogower told the Courier-Journal that the jurors were “randomly selected” and “terribly misused by the most powerful law enforcement official in Kentucky,” adding that “Mr. Cameron continues to blatantly disregard the truth.”

Officers have said they were responding to a shot fired by Taylor's boyfriend Kenneth Walker, who has maintained that he thought intruders were breaking into his girlfriend's home instead of police. Officers used a no-knock drug warrant for Taylor’s ex-boyfriend Jamarcus Glover to justify their presence in Taylor’s home, but Glover didn’t live at Taylor’s house and was already in police custody at the time of the shooting. Det. Joshua Jaynes, who secured the drug warrant, and Det. Myles Cosgrove, who fired the shot the FBI determined killed Taylor, were officially fired this month for their roles in the deadly shooting, the Louisville Metro Police Department confirmed to media on Jan. 6.

Brett Hankison, who is accused of blindly firing 10 shots into Taylor’s home during the raid, was also fired, but Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly, who shot Taylor five times, was only reassigned to administrative work. Mattingly was injured in the incident when Walker shot the cop, Cameron said during a news conference on Sept. 23.

Cameron used the press event to allege that the grand jury “agreed” that Mattingly and Cosgrove were “justified in their return of deadly fire after having been fired upon by Kenneth Walker.” While dodging a question about whether homicide charges were presented to the jury, the prosecutor instead claimed that his office presented “all the information” and jurors “were walked through all the homicide offenses.”

Jurors maintain that simply is not true. “Neither Cameron nor anyone from his office mentioned any homicide offense to the grand jury,” they said in their petition, obtained by the Courier-Journal. “Not only were no homicide offenses presented as alleged, no charges of any kind were presented to the Grand Jury other than the three wanton endangerment charges against Detective Hankinson."

RELATED: In bombshell interview, grand jurors in Breonna Taylor case call out Kentucky AG’s lies

RELATED: Six months after killing Breonna Taylor, Kentucky grand jury indicts 1 officer for 'endangerment'

RELATED: NYTimes video reconstructs Breonna Taylor's murder

On Thanksgiving, I’m thankful my ancestors left Europe, and that America took them in

“I’ve got something I’d like to say.” That’s what I usually offer up as a preamble, as I try to get the attention of my kids and other family members gathered around the Thanksgiving table—although this year, due to COVID-19, it will sadly be just my wife and kids. It usually takes a couple of attempts, but once we’re all on the same page, I offer words of thanks for my ancestors. I talk about how brave they must have been to leave the communities of their birth—which were at least familiar, despite the hardship, discrimination, and all-too-common violence they faced—and come to a land where they didn’t speak the language, didn’t know the culture, and, in many cases, didn’t know a soul.

In this offering, I mention the family names of the people who came and the places they came from. We’ve done quite a bit of genealogical research—on my side and my wife’s side of the family—and are lucky to have as much information as we do. My goal is to give my kids a sense of who their ancestors were, and what they went through to give us a chance to have the life we do. One branch of my father’s family came from Vilnius, now the capital of Lithuania; another from Riga, Latvia’s capital; another from Minsk, capital of Belarus; and the last from Odessa, now in Ukraine. Growing up, I had learned that all my father’s ancestors were “Russian.” It turns out none of them came from places that are now in that country (at least as of this writing).

The story is similar on my mother’s side. One branch was described to me as Austrian; in fact they came from Skole in today’s Ukraine. The other was Hungarian, and came from Sighet (Elie Wiesel’s hometown) in Transylvania, now a province of Romania. During my Thanksgiving meal talk, I also thank my wife’s family, who came from Vienna, Poland, and Russia. In reality, the primary point of identification in terms of culture and identity for all these people was not the country of origin on their passport, but the fact that they were members of the Jewish people, irrespective of any particular level of belief or religiosity.

In addition to being Jews, the family ancestors I’ll be acknowledging were also, of course, Americans. And that’s the other part of the thanks I’ll give on the holiday. I’m thankful that my ancestors had a place to go, that they could become Americans and make a life here.

The last of them got in just under the wire, arriving a few months after the First World War and only a couple of years before a series of immigration “reforms” severely limited the number of immigrants our country accepted from outside the British Isles and northwest Europe. My wife’s grandmother’s family got out of Poland in 1937—and only because the youngest child had been born here (it’s a long story), one of the oldest living “anchor babies,” I’d surmise. Very few Jews were able to find refuge here at that point and immediately afterward—during the years when they needed it most.

I make sure my kids know about these restrictions on immigration, as well as the fact that Asians had almost no chance to emigrate and become U.S. citizens until the early 1950s. We also talk about how—although their ancestors and other Jewish immigrants certainly didn’t have it easy—they at least had opportunities that America denied to the large numbers of African Americans and American Indians who had arrived long before our family. America didn’t treat everyone living here equally, either on paper or in practice. Certainly, as the deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, and too many others have reminded us, we’ve still got room for improvement on that front as well, to say the least, although we have come a long way thanks to those heroes who fought and bled to get us as far as we have come.

Over the past four years, the soon-to-be-former occupant of the White House has been making the process for coming here far more difficult, far more treacherous, for refugees and asylum-seekers. But hopefully, The Man Who Lost The Popular Vote (Again) will be shuffling off the stage in the very near future. That is something for which my family and I are deeply thankful.

Contrast him with the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society of Pennsylvania, who last year organized a Thanksgiving event in Philadelphia specifically for immigrants—the 11th year they’ve done so—although they won’t be able to do something similar this year thanks, if that’s the word, to the pandemic. Over 100 people shared the holiday meal:

Vanessa, who declined to give her last name, says the event is exactly what she and her family needed after being under the threat of deportation.

"We couldn’t miss it today, because recently my parents were in deportation court," she said.

Vanessa says she's thankful her family can stay together just in time for the holiday.

If that organization sounds familiar, it might be because of the wonderful work it does on behalf of immigrants, or it might be because the terrorist who killed 11 Jews at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh specifically mentioned HIAS in a post just a few hours before committing that mass murder:

A couple of hours before opening fire in a Pittsburgh synagogue, Robert Bowers, the suspected gunman, posted on the social network Gab, “HIAS likes to bring invaders in that kill our people. I can’t sit by and watch my people get slaughtered. Screw your optics, I’m going in.” HIAS is the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, and Bowers had posted about it at least once before. Two and a half weeks earlier, he had linked to a HIAS project called National Refugee Shabbat and written, “Why hello there HIAS! You like to bring in hostile invaders to dwell among us?” Another post that most likely referred to HIAS read, “Open you Eyes! It’s the filthy EVIL jews Bringing the Filthy EVIL Muslims into the Country!!”

So while I’m thankful to our country for taking in my family, and so many others, I am aware that not everyone approves of America’s generosity. There’s another person, whose family is also Jewish and from Eastern Europe, who expressed a sense of gratitude that reminded me of my own. This person did so in the context of coming forward to testify in an impeachment inquiry focused on Donald Trump. He has faced anti-Semitism from Trump and his allies in retaliation for stepping forward and telling the truth. Here are the words of Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, words that make me proud to share my heritage with this man:

Next month will mark 40 years since my family arrived in the United States as refugees. When my father was 47 years old he left behind his entire life and the only home he had ever known to start over in the United States so that his three sons could have better, safer lives. His courageous decision inspired a deep sense of gratitude in my brothers and myself and instilled in us a sense of duty and service. All three of us have served or are currently serving in the military. Our collective military service is a special part of our family’s story in America.

I also recognize that my simple act of appearing here today, just like the courage of my colleagues who have also truthfully testified before this Committee, would not be tolerated in many places around the world. In Russia, my act of expressing my concerns to the chain of command in an official and private channel would have severe personal and professional repercussions and offering public testimony involving the President would surely cost me my life. I am grateful for my father’s brave act of hope 40 years ago and for the privilege of being an American citizen and public servant, where I can live free of fear for mine and my family’s safety.

Dad, my sitting here today in the US Capitol talking to our elected officials is proof that you made the right decision forty years ago to leave the Soviet Union and come here to United States of America in search of a better life for our family. Do not worry, I will be fine for telling the truth.

Thanksgiving—at least in the form we celebrate in this country—is an American invention, and also a holiday about each of our relationships to America, and to our fellow Americans. It means different things to different people, depending for some on how their ancestors were treated. For me, America is my home, the only one I’ve got. It is the place that made my life and my family possible. My membership in the American people, the American national community, is central to my identity.

We are living in a time when, once again, demagogues are playing on our deepest fears to argue against taking in people fleeing oppression in their homelands, just as was the case in 1939. Demagogues are also casting doubt on the loyalty of Jewish Americans who were born elsewhere, just as was the case in the Dreyfus Affair over a century ago. I am truly grateful for what America did for me—taking in my ancestors when they needed a place to go. I know there are many others who will end up being far less fortunate. They are the ones we have to fight for now.

This is an updated version of a piece I have posted the last couple years on Thanksgiving.